WaspsAustralian Mud Nest Wasps Bembicinae Bembix Eumeninae Mud Wasp Orange-collared Spider Wasp Potter Wasp Pseudabispa bicolor ssp. nigrocinctoides Yellow and Black Wasp Yellow Hairy Flower Wasp Yellow Hairy Flower Wasp – R tasmaniensis

There are hundreds of thousands of species of wasps in the world, with Australia being home to thousands of native species of wasps. Like bees, they play a critical role in the environment. Whilst some wasps feed on nectar (aiding in plant pollination), equally as important are those whose roles are as predators and parasites, whose larvae feed on caterpillars, spiders, and many other insects.

Paralastor sp. - Alice Springs, NT
Paralastor sp.
Yellow Hairy Flower Wasp (Radumeris tasmaniensis)
Yellow Hairy Flower Wasp (Radumeris tasmaniensis), Alice Springs, NT
Sand Wasp (genus Bembix), Owen Springs Reserve, NT © Dorothy Latimer
Sand Wasp (genus Bembix), Owen Springs Reserve, NT © Dorothy Latimer
Orange Potter Wasp species resting in the shade of a lemon tree
Orange-tailed Potter Wasp (Delta latreillei) / Mud Wasp (Abispa ephippium)
Yellow Hairy Flower Wasp (Radumeris radula)
Yellow Hairy Flower Wasp (Radumeris radula)

  • Scientific classification
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Informal: Pterygotes
  • Order: Hymenoptera

Footnote & References

  1. Wasp Photos and Identification, Aussie Bee, https://www.aussiebee.com.au/wasp-photos.html
  2. Wasp, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasp (last visited Dec. 11, 2021)
  3. Wasp Week, 20 May 2021, Author Kerri-Lee Harris, https://southernforestlife.net/happenings/category/Wasps

WaspsAustralian Mud Nest Wasps Bembicinae Bembix Eumeninae Mud Wasp Orange-collared Spider Wasp Potter Wasp Pseudabispa bicolor ssp. nigrocinctoides Yellow and Black Wasp Yellow Hairy Flower Wasp Yellow Hairy Flower Wasp – R tasmaniensis