As one of the most widely distributed of the Australian burrowing frogs, the Trilling Frog is found inhabiting grasslands in arid and semi-arid regions. Also locally known as the Desert Trilling Frog (Neobatrachus centralis), the following images are those of frogs found in the Ilparpa Claypans in Alice Springs, Central Australia, when water is pooled in the claypans.

Also locally known as the Desert Trilling Frog, they have vertical pupils and are a fawn, pale yellow or grey on their upper side, with small irregular darker patches. The toes are fully webbed with deep indentations between the toes.

Like most desert frogs, they develop quickly from eggs, to tadpole and to frogs.

The following images are of the Desert Trilling Frog having just emerged from aestivation.

The frog eventually loses it dark appearance taking on the fawn, pale yellow or grey on their upper side, with small irregular darker patches. They have vertical pupils, toes fully webbed with deep indentations between the toes. Like most desert frogs, they develop quickly from eggs, to tadpole and to frogs.

Desert Trilling Frog (Neobatrachus centralis)
Desert Trilling Frog (Neobatrachus centralis) emerging from aestivation

  • Scientific classification
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Amphibia
  • Order: Anura
  • Family: Limnodynastidae
  • Genus: Neobatrachus
  • Species: N. centralis
  • Binomial name: Neobatrachus centralis

Our thanks to Alice Springs Desert Park – ASDP / NRETA for assistance with identifying this fauna.


Glossary

aestivation
describes the period of dormancy that occur during hot, dry periods of the year. Analogous to that of hibernation in winter.