Olive Pink Botanic Garden

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The Black-footed Rock Wallaby (Petrogale lateralis) belongs in the genus Petrogale in the family Macropodidae, a group of of marsupials commonly known as rock wallabies.

Rock Wallabies are no taller than half a metre, and it is their agility and speed as they travel across seemingly sheer cliff faces that amazes many people who are lucky to catch a glimpse of them in motion. When not moving, they blend almost perfectly into the rocky escarpment.

Images © Dorothy L

Their ability to traverse rock faces is down to their powerful spring-loaded hind legs, textured soles providing maximum traction, as well as their muscular tails for steering and stability.

The Black-footed Rock Wallaby can often be seen along the rocky escarpment of the East and West MacDonnell Ranges.

Following images of the Black-footed Rock Wallaby sighted on the Meyer’s Hill escarpment in the Olive Pink Botanic Garden. During the cooler months you may catch a glimpse of them enjoying the warmth of the winter sun on the eastern side of the escarpment. Sometimes they come down in the early morning into the garden area, where on occasion you can also see the wallaroos and euros.

Check out our Fauna section about the Black-footed Rock Wallaby and  Kangaroo, Wallaroo, Euro, Wallaby.


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Black-footed Rock Wallaby | Grey-crowned Babbler | Sacred Kingfisher | Western Bowerbird

  • Scientific classification
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Mammalia
  • Infraclass: Marsupialia
  • Order: Diprotodontia
  • Family: Macropodidae
  • Genus: Petrogale
  • Species: P. lateralis
  • Binomial name: Petrogale lateralis