The Bourke’s Parrot (Neopsephotus bourkii), formerly classified as Neophema bourkii, is a small parrot endemic to Australia and the only species in its genus, Neopsephotus.

They are found inhabiting semi-arid acacia woodlands, often resting in the shade of the trees during the day, and becoming active around dust and dawn. In the wild, they can sometimes be seen at waterholes and bores.

The juvenile birds of both sexes are very similar until about nine months of age. They then assume the full plumage colour. The plumage is mostly grey-brown with a pale blue feathering on its rump, the sides of its tail and on its wings. Its breast and belly are a pale shade of pink. The adult male has blue on the forehead, whilst the adult female has a little or no blue on the forehead.

Their legs are dark-brown, and they have zygodactyl toes (having two toes pointing forward and two backward). The bill is varies from grey to yellowish-brown.

Captive Bourke’s Parrots have been known to have colour mutations.

Common name
Bourke’s parakeet, blue-vented parrot, pink-bellied parrot, sundown parrot, Bourke or “Bourkie”.

Images © Dorothy L


  • Scientific classification
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Aves
  • Order: Psittaciformes
  • Family: Psittaculidae
  • Genus: Neopsephotus
  • Species: N. bourkii
  • Binomial name: Neopsephotus bourkii
  • Synonyms: Neophema bourkii

Footnote & References

  1. Bourke’s Parrot, Alice Springs Desert Park, Ausemade Pty Ltd